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  • Former Malaysia Prime Minister charged with money laundering

    On August 8, Malaysia’s former Prime Minister Najib Razak pleaded not guilty to money laundering charges filed against him in Malaysia in connection with the ongoing investigation of state fund 1MDB. Razak had previously pleaded not guilty to three charges of criminal breach of trust and one charge of abuse of power. The money laundering charges relate to approximately $10 million that was allegedly deposited into the former Prime Minister’s personal bank account. That is a small portion of the total funds under investigation as misappropriated from the state fund.

    The day before, a $250 million super yacht was returned to Malaysia after it was previously seized in Indonesia following claims by the U.S. Department of Justice that is was purchased with funds misappropriated from 1MDB. Back in July 2016, DOJ filed civil forfeiture complaints seeking recovery of more than $1 billion in assets associated with the alleged “international conspiracy to launder funds misappropriated from [1MDB].” In June 2017, DOJ filed additional civil forfeiture complaints to recover another $540 million in assets. The investigation into assets linked to the state fund 1MDB continues with DOJ alleging that more than $3.5 billion in total funds were misappropriated from 1MDB from 2009 through 2015.

    DOJ Anti-Money Laundering

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  • Former Barbados Minister of Industry charged with money laundering

    On August 6, the Department of Justice announced the arrest and first court appearance of Donville Inniss, former Minister of Industry of Barbados, who DOJ has charged with “laundering bribes that he allegedly received from a Barbadian insurance company in exchange for official actions he took to secure government contracts for the insurance company.” The indictment, which was initially issued under seal on March 15, charges Inniss with one count of conspiracy to launder money and two counts of money laundering. It also seeks forfeiture of the funds he received as alleged bribes. The indictment alleges that as Minister of Industry, Inniss caused the Barbados Investment & Development Corporation, an agency of the Barbados Government, to renew two contracts with the Barbadian insurance company. In return, the insurance company purportedly paid him approximately $36,000, routing the payments through a dental company and its bank account located in New York. The indictment also references as co-conspirator, but does not name, the CEO of the dental company, a United States citizen and resident of Tampa, Florida. Inniss is also a lawful permanent resident of Tampa, Florida.

    DOJ Anti-Money Laundering

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  • Another executive arrested in PDVSA bribery case

    On August 1, DOJ announced the arrest of Jose Manuel Gonzalez Testino, a dual U.S.-Venezuelan citizen, on foreign bribery charges for making and conspiring to make corrupt payments to an official of Venezuela’s state-owned energy company, Petroleos de Venezuela S.A. (PDVSA). Gonzalez was arrested at Miami International Airport on an arrest warrant based on a criminal complaint in the Southern District of Texas, which was unsealed on July 31. Gonzalez made an initial appearance before a magistrate judge in the Southern District of Florida.

    According to the criminal complaint, Gonzalez and a co-conspirator paid at least $629,000 in bribes to a former PDVSA official in exchange for favorable business treatment for Gonzalez’s companies, including: (1) directing PDVSA contracts to Gonzalez’s companies, (2) giving Gonzalez’s companies priority over other vendors to receive payments, and (3) awarding Gonzalez’s companies contracts in U.S. dollars rather than Venezuelan bolivars.

    DOJ has announced charges against 17 individuals, including Gonzalez, as part of its investigation into bribery at PDVSA. 12 individuals have pleaded guilty.

    DOJ FCPA Bribery Petroleos de Venezuela

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  • DOJ supervisor over fraud section addresses Global Forum on Anti-Corruption Compliance

    On July 25, Deputy Assistant Attorney General Matthew Miner, who oversees the Fraud Section as well as other parts of the Criminal Division, spoke at ACI’s 9th Global Forum on Anti-Corruption Compliance in High Risk Markets. His speech focused on the DOJ’s efforts to combat global corruption, with a focus on merger and acquisition activity. Miner emphasized, among other things, the efforts the Department was taking to reduce global corruption, highlighting in particular the DOJ’s permanent enshrinement of the FCPA self-disclosure program. He pointed to a recent success of that program, the DOJ’s declination of prosecution against a commercial data company for hiring-related misconduct by its recently acquired China subsidiaries, previously discussed here. Miner also discussed the Department recent “anti-piling on policy,” under which it gives credit for penalties paid to other enforcement authorities for the same misconduct. As an example of this policy, he noted how the Department credited 50% of the fine a French multinational banking and financial services company paid to French authorities for FCPA-related misconduct in a recent enforcement action.

    Miner asserted that the Department would like to do a better job providing guidance to companies facing FCPA risk through mergers and acquisitions, particularly when such activity is in high-risk industries and markets. He quoted from the DOJ’s 2012 Resource Guide, noting that in an acquisition, “a successor company’s voluntary disclosure, appropriate due diligence, and implementation of an effective compliance program may also decrease the likelihood of an enforcement action regarding an acquired company’s post-acquisition conduct when pre-acquisition due diligence is not possible.” Addressing pre-acquisition diligence, Miner stated that when an acquiring company encounters corruption issues during the diligence process, it should come to the Department for guidance through its FCPA Opinion Procedures before moving forward. Miner stated that not enough companies are taking advantage of this “tremendous resource.”

    Miner commented overall that with these policies and procedures, the Department hopes “to incentivize companies to invest in effective compliance programs and robust control systems to prevent misconduct and, in the event of a detected violation, to take full advantage of [the DOJ’s] enforcement approach.”

    DOJ FCPA Anti-Corruption

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  • Latest conviction in PDVSA bribery case

    On July 16, 2018, Luis Carlos De Leon-Perez, a dual U.S.-Venezuelan citizen, pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to violate the FCPA and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering. De Leon’s convictions relate to allegations that he bribed officials at Venezuela’s state-owned oil company, Petroleos de Venezuela S.A. (PDVSA), and laundered money for bribes to other company employees. FCPA Scorecard provided earlier coverage of this case here.

    De Leon admitted to soliciting and directing bribes from two U.S. citizens, including Cesar David Rincon Godoy, in exchange for securing payment priority for their companies from PDVSA and for awards of PDVSA contracts. De Leon also admitted to conspiring with these individuals to launder and conceal the proceeds of the scheme through a series of financial transactions, including wire transfers to offshore accounts. Sentencing is scheduled for September 24, 2018.

    De Leon’s conviction underscores how wide investigations can become as the DOJ continues pulling threads and obtaining guilty pleas. The DOJ has charged 15 defendants in the PDVSA cases, 12 of whom have pleaded guilty to date, including De Leon. DOJ also credited the assistance of the Swiss Federal Office of Justice and the Spanish Guardia Civil.

    DOJ FCPA Anti-Money Laundering Bribery Petroleos de Venezuela

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  • Global bank pays $76.7 million to settle hiring practices case

    A global bank and its Hong Kong subsidiary reached a settlement with the DOJ and the SEC related to its alleged practice of “awarding employment to friends and family of Chinese officials” to win business. The subsidiary agreed to pay a $47 million criminal penalty as part of a non-prosecution agreement with the DOJ. It also agreed to continue to cooperate in any ongoing investigations. The DOJ noted that the subsidiary had not self-reported the conduct or properly disciplined the employees involved, although it did receive partial credit for cooperating with the investigation once it began. 

    The parent bank agreed to disgorge nearly $30 million in profits and prejudgment interest in an SEC administrative proceeding. The SEC noted the criminal fine imposed by the DOJ in deciding not to impose a civil penalty. 

    For prior coverage of the sons and daughters investigations into hiring practices in Asia, please see here

    DOJ FCPA Sons and Daughters

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  • Aruban telecom official sentenced for money laundering conspiracy involving FCPA violations

    On June 27, Judge Frederico Moreno of the United States District Court of the Southern District of Florida sentenced Egbert Yvan Ferdinand Koolman, an official of Servicio di Telecommunicacion di Aruba N.V. (Setar), to 36 months in prison following his guilty plea for money laundering charges in connection with a scheme to arrange and receive corrupt payments to influence the awarding of contracts in Aruba. According to the DOJ’s press release, Koolman, between 2005 and 2016, used his position as Setar’s product manager to influence the awarding of lucrative mobile phone and accessory contracts with the Aruban state-owned telecommunications company. Koolman also admitted to providing favored vendors with confidential Setar information in exchange for more than $1.3 million in corrupt payments. Koolman was ordered to pay over $1.3 million in restitution and to serve three years of supervised release following his prison term.

    Previous Scorecard coverage of this matter can be found here.

    DOJ Anti-Money Laundering FCPA

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  • Global bank settles FCPA allegations concerning “sons and daughters” investigation into hiring practices

    On June 6, a global bank announced it had entered into a non-prosecution agreement with the DOJ to resolve an FCPA investigation into hiring practices in the Asia Pacific region between 2007 and 2013. As part of the agreement, the bank agreed to pay a $46 million penalty to the DOJ. According to the bank, it has already provisioned for the penalty and expects the payment to have “no material impact” on its second quarter financial results. The bank further stated that it has implemented multiple enhancements to its compliance and control functions since 2013. 

    U.S. authorities have investigated several other financial services institutions over their hiring practices in Asia, which have become known as the “sons and daughters” investigations because of the allegations that banks widely hired the children of elite Chinese political families to secure an advantage in obtaining business. Prior Scorecard coverage of those investigations can be found here.

    DOJ FCPA Sons and Daughters

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  • Legg Mason settles FCPA allegations with DOJ

    On June 4, the DOJ announced that Legg Mason, a Baltimore-based investment management firm, had entered into a non-prosecution agreement and agreed to pay $64.2 million to resolve FCPA allegations in connection with the firm’s involvement in Libya through Permal, a London-based fund purchased by the firm. Between 2004 and 2010, Permal, a Legg Mason subsidiary, partnered with Société Générale S.A., a Paris-based multinational bank, “to solicit business from state-owned financial institutions in Libya.” As admitted by Société Générale in its own resolution with the DOJ, Société Générale paid bribes of over $90 million through the use of a Libyan broker with respect to 14 investments made by Libyan state-owned financial institutions. For seven of the transactions, Société Générale made payments to the Libyan broker to benefit Legg Mason, through Permal. Permal managed the investments and earned profits of approximately $31 million.

    Legg Mason’s resolution includes a penalty of $32.625 million and disgorgement of $31.617 million. As part of the agreement, Legg Mason agreed to continue to cooperate with the DOJ in related investigations and prosecutions, as well as to enhance its compliance program. According to the DOJ, the resolution is based on factors including Legg Mason’s cooperation in the investigation, as well as the fact that the company “did not voluntarily and timely disclose the conduct at issue.” The DOJ also found that the misconduct was “not pervasive throughout Legg Mason or Permal,” but rather that Société Générale was responsible for running the scheme, noting that Legg Mason and Permal earned less than one-tenth of the profits earned by Société Générale.

    As FCPA Scorecard previously reported, Legg Mason had announced the near completion of the agreement in a recent SEC filing.

    DOJ FCPA Legg Mason Société Générale S.A.

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  • Société Générale settles FCPA allegations concerning bribery of Libyan officials

    On June 4, the DOJ announced that Société Générale S.A., a Paris-based multinational bank, and its wholly owned subsidiary SGA Société Générale Acceptance N.V., agreed to pay $585 million to resolve charges in the United States and France involving bribes to Libyan officials. According to the DOJ, Société Générale will enter into a deferred prosecution agreement related to charges of conspiracy to violate the FCPA’s anti-bribery provisions. Société Générale’s subsidiary will also plead guilty in the Eastern District of New York to similar charges. Almost $293 million of the resolution will be paid to France and credited by the U.S. This is the first coordinated anti-bribery enforcement action by the DOJ and French authorities. 

    Société Générale admitted that it had paid over $90 million in bribes through a Libyan broker in connection with 14 investments made by state-owned financial institutions in Libya. For each transaction, Société Générale paid the Libyan broker a commission, some of which the Libyan broker then paid to high ranking Libyan officials to secure the investments for Société Générale from the state institutions. This scheme resulted in Société Générale obtaining 13 investments and one restructuring from the Libyan state institutions, and earning approximately $523 million in profits. The scheme also involved payments for the benefit of a Legg Mason subsidiary; Legg Mason resolved its FCPA issues with the DOJ on the same day.

    As part of the same deferred prosecution agreement, Société Générale also agreed to pay $275 million to resolve charges arising from manipulation of U.S.-dollar and Japanese yen LIBOR.

    DOJ Société Générale S.A. France Bribery Legg Mason

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